Melanoma Monday- May 1st

Mark your calendars! 
Melanoma Monday- May 1st

Monday, May 1st we encourage each of you to wear orange in support of Melanoma Monday. May is recognized as Skin Cancer Awareness Month and we’re kicking it off by rocking orange to bring awareness to the severity of skin cancer and importance of annual screenings and proactive habits. 

Show us your support by sharing photos of you in your orange on our Facebook Page or by tagging us on Instagram @GermainDermatology. 

Mark Your Calendars! Melanoma Monday- May 2nd

May is Melanoma Awareness Month and we kick it off with Melanoma Monday
We encourage everyone to wear Orange with us in observance of Melanoma and Skin Cancer Awareness on Monday, May 2nd.  
Join us to encourage sun safety this Summer. 

  • Each year in the U.S. over 5.4 million cases of nonmelanoma skin cancer are treated in more than 3.3 million people.
  • Each year there are more new cases of skin cancer than the combined incidence of cancers of the breast, prostate, lung and colon.
  • Over the past three decades, more people have had skin cancer than all other cancers combined.

SPOT Orange~ Raising Awareness for Skin Cancers

May is Skin Cancer/Melanoma Awareness month, a cause that we take very seriously at Germain Dermatology. Skin Cancers, unfortunately, will effect 1 in 5 Americans despite the advances in medicine, which is why it is so important to use this month to raise the awareness and spread the education needed to prevent this disease!

The American Academy of Dermatology launched a campaign called SPOT Skin Cancer encouraging thousands of it’s members and supporters to commit to raising awareness and prevention options for Melanoma and Skin Cancers each May.

We are PROUD to be supporting this campaign and kicking off the month with SPOT Orange Melanoma Monday. A day to rally together in the effort of educating the public on how to perform self exams, how to get proper skin screenings and ways to protect themselves from becoming a statistic. Show your support on Monday, May 4th by wearing your best Orange gear (We understand this may be an issue for Gamecock fans, but it is for a good cause!).

Get your whole office to join, your friends, your family, whomever you can gather and snap a picture in support of Melanoma Monday. Share your photo on our Facebook, tag us on Twitter @Germain_Beauty or Instagram @GermainDermatology and one lucky person, office or group will have the chance to win a FREE Germain Rx Sunscreen of their choice. We will be sure to show off our staff rocking their orange, too! 

Check out these great resources from the AAD:
Types of Skin Cancer
How to Detect Skin Cancer
Skin Cancer Quiz

Let’s SPOT Orange!

As we kick off the month of May we want to impress the importance and raise the awareness of skin cancer.  May starts summer break, vacations and lots of time outdoors, and while we love warmer weather, protecting yourself from the risks of skin cancer is one of the most important things you can do for your health. 
Join us, and the American Academy of Dermatology, in painting the nation orange for skin cancer awareness on Monday, May 6 – Melanoma Monday®. Rock your orange as a way to raise awareness of melanoma and other types of skin cancer, and to encourage early detection through self-exams. 
Did you know:
-Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States.
-Current estimates are that one in five Americans will be diagnosed with skin cancer in their lifetime.
-Melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, is the most common cancer for 25- to 29-year-olds.
The five-year survival rate for people whose melanoma is detected and treated before it spreads to the lymph nodes is 98 percent. Yet, sadly, one American dies from melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, almost every hour.
Be smart with your skin!
• Generously apply a broad-spectrum water-resistant sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of 30 or more to all exposed skin. Broad-spectrum provides protection from both ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) rays. Re-apply approximately every two hours, even on cloudy days, and after swimming or sweating.
• Wear protective clothing, such as a long-sleeved shirt, pants, a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses, where possible.
• Seek shade when appropriate, remembering that the sun’s rays are strongest between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. If your shadow is shorter than you are, seek shade.
• Use extra caution near water, snow, and sand as they reflect the damaging rays of the sun which can increase your chance of skin cancer.
• Get vitamin D safely through a healthy diet that may include vitamin supplements. Don’t seek the sun.
• Avoid tanning beds. Ultraviolet light from the sun and tanning beds can cause skin cancer and wrinkling. If you want to look like you’ve been in the sun, consider using a sunless self-tanning product, but continue to use sunscreen with it.
• Check your birthday suit monthly. If you notice anything changing, growing, or bleeding on your skin, see a dermatologist. Skin cancer is very treatable when caught early.
Visit www.SpotSkinCancer.org/SPOTOrange for more great resources. The site also offers a downloadable body mole map for tracking changes in your skin, a search tool to find free skin cancer screenings in your area and SPOT products.